Technology Education Department Courses (including Project Lead the Way)

Completion of a course in this area of study will provide an opportunity for the student to become technically competent in a number of communication processes and systems.  An understanding and manipulation of necessary resources is needed to develop, produce and deliver electronic and graphic media.  Students will process and obtain the knowledge necessary to make decisions concerning the impact of communication on society and the environment.

 

Introduction to Drafting & Design
Offered to grades: 10, 11, 12
Length: 1 Term
Category: Elective
Prerequisite: None

Students who have taken Introduction to Engineering and Design may not take this course.

Introduction to Drafting & Design is an ideal course for students pursuing careers in engineering, manufacturing, or design/drawing. This course will focus on sketching and computer aided drawing. Students will use the design process and a variety of drawing processes on projects. A variety of computer drawing programs will be introduced to students. Students are evaluated on drawings, written assignments, quizzes and tests. This course builds a solid foundation for all the design, manufacturing, and construction courses. 

The student will:

  • Apply the design process to a variety of design problems defined by the instructor
  • Complete drawings using proper sketching techniques
  • Use proper drawing and dimensioning techniques for orthographic and pictorial drawings
  • Develop verbal communication skills, social behavioral skills and time management

Architectural Drawing
Offered to grades: 10, 11, 12
Length: 1 Term
Category: Elective
Prerequisite: Introduction to Drafting & Design or Introduction to Engineering Design recommended

Students pursuing careers in architecture, construction and civil engineering should consider this course. Architectural drawing emphasizes the study of architecture. Students will design residential houses and apply drafting techniques and standards. Projects consist of developing foundation/basement plans, floor plans, elevation plans, section detail plans, schedules, and designing a house model. Students will apply architectural styles and a variety of engineering design elements and principles in house designs.

The student will:

  • Use computer and peripheral devices to aid in the documentation for design projects
  • Apply technical drawing skills, architectural styles and engineering principles in residential house design
  • Study career pathways for architecture related careers

Introduction to Construction
Offered to grades: 10, 11, 12
Length: 1 Term
Category: Elective
Prerequisite: Introduction to Woodworking

Dual Credit (DMACC) Course

Introduction to Construction curriculum is designed to engage students in learning about and producing construction type activities which will teach entry level construction skills and everyday skills used by society. Students will learn how these skills, along with new techniques, impact and affect our daily lives. Areas of safety, print reading, layout, basic building skills and project development are thoroughly studied. Projects may include site layout, concrete work, shed or garage construction, or any other residential related construction activities. Evaluations will be through class discussions, written assignments, required lab projects, safety skills and work efforts on job sites.

The student will:

  • Demonstrate basic safety and safe operating procedures necessary for a construction project
  • Understand the basic background knowledge required for entry into the construction industry
  • Understand the sequence of procedures necessary for a construction project
  • Differentiate among and apply the appropriate methods to complete major projects

Intro to Metalworking
Offered to grades: 10, 11, 12
Length: 1 Term
Category: Elective
Prerequisite: It is strongly recommended that Introduction to drafting or Introduction to Engineering Design be taken prior to registering for this class.

The Introduction to Metalworking curriculum is designed to engage students in learning about and producing products, which are made from a variety of metal materials. Students will learn how these processes along with new techniques affect our daily lives. Areas of welding, sheet metal, bench metals, CNC machining, and machine tooling are thoroughly studied. The class will focus on learning metal concepts and how to operate machinery. Students will also learn forming, separating, combining, and finishing processes. Students will be responsible for purchasing materials for projects not required by the instructor. Evaluations will be through class discussions, written assignments, required lab projects, machine safety skills, and written/lab tests.

The student will:

  • Demonstrate a competent safety level on production machinery and increase their skill level on metal machinery
  • Demonstrate how to work with ferrous and non-ferrous materials
  • Know careers in industry related to manufacturing and metalworking
  • Demonstrate correct layout, measurement, and production of materials by following detail plans
  • Apply manufacturing skills learned throughout the class to make students better problem solvers, consumers, and cooperative workers

Introduction to Woodworking
Offered to grades: 10, 11, 12
Length: 1 Term
Category: Elective
Prerequisite: It is strongly recommended that Introduction to drafting or Introduction to Engineering Design be taken prior to registering for this class.

The Introduction to Woodworking curriculum is designed to engage students in learning about and producing products that are made from wood materials. Students will learn how these processes along with new techniques affect our daily lives. Areas of hand tools, machine safety, and basic machine operation are thoroughly studied. The class will focus on wood concepts, woodworking processes, safety and producing different projects. Students will be responsible for purchasing materials for individual projects if not required by the instructor. Evaluations will be through class discussions, written assignments, required lab projects, machine safety skills, and written/lab tests.

The student will:

  • Demonstrate a competent safety level on production machinery and increase their skill level on wood working machines
  • Demonstrate how and where wood product materials are used in manufacturing
  • Know the careers in industry related to manufacturing and woodworking
  • Demonstrate correct layout, measurement, and production of materials by following detailed plans
  • Apply manufacturing skills learned throughout the class to make students better problem solvers, consumers, and cooperative workers

Advanced Woodworking
Offered to grades: 10, 11, 12
Length: 1 Term
Category: Elective
Prerequisite: Introduction to Woodworking

The advanced woods course is designed to increase student skills in the woodworking area. Students taking this class will learn a variety of woodworking procedures and processes. Students are responsible for organizing, building and purchasing an individualized project. (If students are unable to acquire materials on their own, arrangements will be made to provide a similar experience with school provided materials but projects will not go home with students in this instance.) The individual project includes research, detailed plans, bill of materials, layout, assembly and finishing. Evaluation includes class discussion, written assignments, required lab projects, machine safety skills and written/practicum tests/final projects.

The student will:

  • Master machinery safety and gain an appreciation for equipment
  • Apply jigs and fixtures for machine operations
  • Demonstrate proper measurement, calculating and layout procedures
  • Draw or sketch desired work pieces along with formulating detailed bill of materials
  • Understand and demonstrate the processes of changing raw materials into useful consumer goods

Advanced Metalworking
Offered to grades: 10, 11, 12
Length: 1 Term
Category: Elective
Prerequisite: Intro to Metalworking

This advanced level course will study types of metals and metalworking processes beyond basic metalworking. Instruction will cover machine tooling, CNC machining, metal cutting, and advanced welding. The course consists of required projects. Evaluation includes class discussion, written assignments, lab projects, machine safety and written/practicum tests. Students will study career options related to the various machine tooling areas. The student will: Set up and use precision machining equipment. Understand the processes involved in metal casting by producing machineable casts from a match plate. Measure parts using precision measurement tools such as micrometers or dial calipers. Perform maintenance procedures on various lab equipment or cutting tools. Develop Computer Numerical Code (CNC) programs to produce a usable product. Master basic welding skills and understand types of advanced welding.

The student will:

  • Set up and use precision machining equipment
  • Understand the processes involved in metal casting by producing machineable casts from a match plate
  • Measure parts using precision measurement tools such as micrometers or dial calipers
  • Perform maintenance procedures on various lab equipment or cutting tools 
  • Develop Computer Numerical Code (CNC) programs to produce a usable product 
  • Master basic welding skills and understand types of advanced welding

Welding
Offered to grades: 10, 11, 12
Length: 1 Term
Category: Elective
Prerequisite: Introduction to Metalworking, Advanced Metalworking

This advanced level course will study the different types of welding processes including Arc, MIG TIG, Oxyfuel, Plasma cutting beyond basic welding techniques. Instruction will focus on students performing these various welding types using different processes and techniques along the way. Students will also be exposed to cutting techniques required to create weldable parts. Students will be asked to research these various welding techniques prior to hands-on learning. Assessments in this course will come through class discussions, written assignments prior to and after required lab projects, welding safety skills, and written/lab tests, and required hands-on labs.

The student will:

  • Demonstrate proficiency in welding and cutting tools while expanding competency in welding techniques.  
  • Demonstrate how to weld various types of metals using different techniques
  • Know different careers in industry related to welding
  • Demonstrate proper set up and shutdown of the different types of welding equipment
  • Apply welding techniques learned throughout the class to make students better problem solvers
  • Master advanced welding skills and joinery

Research and Development
Offered to grades: 11, 12
Length: 1 Term
Category: Elective
Prerequisite: Instructor Approval

The course is designed for those students who wish additional study beyond what is offered in each technical area. Students who take this course do so on a contract basis. Students will choose their area of interest and then contract with the instructor for requirements and grading. A portfolio of student’s work is required beyond the basic contract requirements. Contracts may be obtained from the Counselor or instructor.

The student will:

  • Master technical skills in one of the following areas of study:  Communications; Construction; Manufacturing; Energy, Power and Transportation; and Engineering
  • Develop a portfolio showing technical skills and work capabilities
  • Become self-driven and develop weekly and long term goals in order to accomplish contract requirements
  • Explain career pathways in a cluster area of interest and develop a vision on how to successfully become part of this profession

Project Lead the Way 

  • College credit can be attained toward any Project Lead the Way affiliated school.  The University of Iowa and Iowa State University are PLTW affiliates.  University of Iowa college credit is attained by achieving a stanine score of 6 or higher on the PLTW national exam. That PLTW stanine scale is 1-9, with 9 being the highest score attainable. 3 hours of college credit will be awarded after meeting the above requirements and paying a fee. DMACC is given to all students registered in IED, POE, and DE once they have completed the course.

Principles of Engineering
Offered to grades: 10, 11, 12
Length: 2 Terms (1 High School, 1 College)
Category: Elective
Prerequisite: Introduction to Engineering Design – Strongly recommended: Algebra II

Dual Credit (DMACC) Course

This course helps students understand and focus on real world problems and solutions, not just design.  Students will be provided with the opportunity to learn about various technological systems (simple machines, gears, energy, electricity, robots, bridge building, projectile motion, and materials testing among others).  While IED is a prerequisite for this course, content within Principles of Engineering will have a stronger emphasis on the Engineering/math/science required and less on design and Autodesk inventor usage although it doesn’t fully go away.  Many activities in this class will be partner based.  Students will learn about the concepts within class and then will be tasked with putting them into practice by building, constructing, and testing their solutions using a variety of different materials and mediums.

The student will:

  • Develop increased knowledge and skill in design, modeling, optimization, engineering systems, technology/society interactions, and engineering ethics  
  • Apply and refine a series of broad-based skills needed within the case study activities: communication; use of technical tools, resources and processes; measurement; and applying mathematics and science
  • Develop skills of learning cooperatively with others
  • Research engineering careers using a variety of media sources

Introduction to Engineering Design
Offered to grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Length: 2 TERMS (1 High School, 1 College)
Category: Elective
Prerequisite: Enrollment in Algebra or Geometry

Dual Credit (DMACC) Course

This course teaches problem-solving skills using a design development process.  Models of product solutions are created, analyzed and communicated using 3D solid modeling CADD software.  Products will be designed individually and in a group environment.  Students interested in design or engineering will benefit greatly from this course.

Digital Electronics
Offered to grades: 10, 11, 12
Length: 2 TERMS (1 High School, 1 College)
Category: Elective
Prerequisite: Algebra II or concurrent enrollment in Algebra II Highly Recommended

Dual Credit (DMACC) Course

This course introduces students to applied digital logic, a key element of careers in engineering and engineering technology.  This course explores the smart circuits found in watches, calculators, video games, and computers.  Students use industry-standard computer software in testing and analyzing digital circuitry.  Students design circuits to solve problems and use appropriate components to build their designs.  Students use mathematics and science in solving real-world engineering problems.

This course covers several topics, including:

  • Analog and digital electrical systems
  • The digital design process
  • Combinational and sequential logic
  • Number systems, Boolean Algebra, and circuit simplification
  • Circuit simulation, prototyping, and building
  • State machines and control system

 


Department Faculty

To view the instructors for this content area, please see the department directory below.